On Exhibit: Earth from Space Posters

On display at St. Thomas University Library until May 14, 2016, Earth from Space is a poster exhibit that features images and text from the popular Smithsonian Institution exhibition of the same name. Earth from Space was developed by the Center for Earth and Planetary Studies at the National Air and Space Museum and was curated by geographer Andrew Johnston. The poster exhibit is made possible by a partnership between The Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service and the U.S. Geological Survey.

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About the Posters

The 20 posters present large images of the Earth shown from space, color reproductions of images that are captured by satellites that circle the globe recording the conditions and events that occur on the planet’s surface. The rare views of events such as dust storms, forest fires, volcanic eruptions, and Florida’s favorite, hurricanes, are accompanied by text that explains how satellite imagery is gathered and used to explore the Earth.

Educational Tie-Ins

The imagery of the Earth captured in this poster exhibit touches on geography, environmental studies, ecology, oceanography, and meteorology. There are many educational resources and activities available on the “Earth from Space” website, such as lesson plans that will be engaging and helpful in the classroom. The lesson plans range from grades 5 to 12. The Earth Exploration Toolbook contains a chapter called “Annotating Change in Satellite Images” that walks readers through a technique for documenting change detected in before-and-after sets of satellite images. Each lesson plan includes classroom materials tied to National Science Standards. Other related resources include an Earth from Space video produced by NASA and another video of the same title produced by NOVA.

Feel free to stop by the Library to view the images of Earth from Space.

This blog post was authored by Yva Audate, a St. Thomas University undergraduate student who works as an assistant to Librarian Nina Rose.

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